Food Lifestyle Skincare

Inside Out for Beautiful Skin


Antioxidant

I am very blessed when it comes to having great friends and great friends who are also a wealth of knowledge and information.  My friend, Dr. Chris Mink, writes about foods that help create more lovely skin.

As your grandma always said, beauty starts on the inside. For your skin, this is definitely true!

A healthy diet is often overlooked but may actually be the most important step for gorgeous, glowing skin. From acne to wrinkles, a well-balanced, nutrient-rich diet may be the perfect antidote.

Dr. Andrew Weil (integrative medicine physician, known for melding natural remedies and western medicine) and Mayo Clinic dermatologists, as well as researchers worldwide all recommend paying attention to what you eat in order to nurture radiant skin.

These experts suggest a diet rich in the following foods:

  • Remember the adage, “eat your colors?” A palette for your palate is the way to go for promoting an elegant epidermis. Antioxidants are one of our bodies’ best defenses against cell damage. Fruits and vegetables in the reds, yellows and oranges (e.g. apricots, carrots, strawberries and tomatoes), greens (leafy veggies such as spinach and kale) and blues (blueberries) are all great sources of antioxidants – not to mention, tasty!
  • Omega-3 fatty acids. These compounds can be found in fatty fish such as mackerel and salmon, flaxseeds, nuts (especially walnuts) and soybeans, among others. Many of these foods also offer omega 6 fatty acids, which may defend against skin dryness. In addition to helping your skin, omegas offer other health benefits, notably reducing your risk of heart disease.
  • So-called “good oils,” such as extra-virgin olive oil and cold or expeller-pressed oils. These oils are more simply processed than many commercially available canola and vegetable oils, and offer the benefit of being emollients.
  • Natural foods (including beans, peas, and lentils) and whole-grains. These items are generally rich in fiber and vitamins, contributing to overall health including for your skin.
  • Plenty of water to maintain your hydration. Water supports strong blood flow, giving skin vibrancy from the inside out, and it assists with flushing out toxins. The general rule is 64 oz. for daily intake for a healthy adult.
  • Green tea. Freshly brewed green tea (and even some bottled products) contains catechins, which are potent antioxidants and thus, anti-inflammatory.
  • A variety of foods. This increases your chances of consuming a mixture of micronutrients, minerals and vitamins. Micronutrients, such as selenium, CoQ10 and magnesium, are essential dietary items but the body only needs tiny amounts. Most of these nutrients are found naturally in the foods listed above.

In addition to these skin healthful tips, limit your intake of processed and refined foods, such as white bread and sugar. Highly refined foods offer little nutritional value and may contain traces of toxic substances used in processing, e.g. hexane or formaldehyde. Some processed foods may even promote the appearance of aging.

My favorite advice from Dr. Weil – occasionally indulge in a piece of dark chocolate; it contains antioxidants and satisfies your sweet tooth. Since it’s for medicinal purposes for your skin – you’re just following doctor’s orders.

Resources:

  1. Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet @ http://www.drweil.com/drw/ecs/pyramid/press-foodpyramid.html#_ga=1.265624969.745481270.1430235073
  2. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/healthy-skin/faq-20058184
  3. http://www.webmd.com/beauty/skin/ss/slideshow-skin-foods
  4. http://foodbabe.com/2015/02/04/cooking-oils
  5. http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02033/natural-skin-care.html

 

ChrisAnna Mink MD is a pediatrician at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. She received her Master of Arts in Specialized Journalism, Emphasis in Health and Science from USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism. Her specific areas of interests include health care for underserved communities, child health and well-being and global health.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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